May 31

Types of shoe

Why do horses need shoes anyway?

Wild ponies don’t need shoes so why do ours?

Actually, whether domestic horses need shoes is debated. Wild horses amble long distances daily, usually over rough grassland, which gradually builds up hard hooves. Domestic horses usually grow weaker hooves because of intermittent exercise, often over softer, damper ground. In horses expected to work on hard surfaces, horseshoes can prevent hooves wearing and splitting. Some hoof conditions can be improved with the use of certain shoes.

Concave

These are the most commonly used shoe for riding horses, they have good grip and wear. They have a trough where the farrier puts the nails. This colleges dirt which aids grip.

Natural Balance

This shoe has a squared off end. It is designed to help increase the natural movement of the foot, these shoes help reduce stress on the deep flexor tendon.


Fullered

Horses who need more support for their heels will normally wear a fullered shoe. But they are heavier and less grippy. Because they are a little bit wider than the hoof, they can be pulled off easily.

Eggbar

These shoes are used in corrective shoeing to treat lots of conditions which can cause lameness. The egg bar only provides heel support

Plained

These are the hardest wearing shoes, and you normally see them on heavy horses. They don’t have a trough which means they don’t have a lot of grip. These shoes can be quite slippy on roads

Heartbar

These shoes are used in corrective shoeing to treat lots of conditions which can cause lameness. The heartbar supports both the frog and the heel

Let’s look at how shoes are fitted by the farrier.

Click here to find out more.